Outer Banks History Lesson: Dialect and Vocabulary

The Outer Banks is definitely a unique place, from the wild horses that roam our beaches to the vast history stemming from the Lost Colony and ending with our locals. If you’ve ever really listened to a born and raised Outer Banks local, you’ll notice a slight accent. A mix of southern twang with a little something you can’t really put your finger on. The Brogue dialect of the Outer Banks is a combination of good old southern drawl mixed with the remnants of old English pronunciations and terms that you probably haven’t ever heard in your life! So, we’ve given you a short list of pronunciations commonly used Outer Banks terms, words and their meanings so you can keep up with the locals and learn something new!

The Brogue dialect of the Outer Banks is a combination of good old southern drawl mixed with the remnants of old English pronunciations and terms that you probably haven’t ever heard in your life! So, we’ve given you a few commonly used Outer Banks pronunciations, terms, words and their meanings so you can keep up with the locals and learn something new!

 

Hoi toide on the saindsoide (High Tide on the sound side)

How locals (usually born and raised Ocracoke natives) pronounce the phrase “high tide on the soundside”; describing that the tide is high on the sound side of the island.

 

 

Corolla (Core-all-ah) – Northernmost Outer Banks town; home to the wild horses that roam the beaches

 

 

Mommucked (Moh-mucked) – To be worn out and tired or to mess something up

via We Heart It

“I’ve been out on the beach all day, I’m pure mommucked” or “She really mommucked up that cake”

 

 

Slickcalm/ Slickcam – When the water is flat and glassy; no wind at all

“The water is so pretty when it’s slickcam”

 

 

Pizer (pie-zir) – Porch

via Pinterest

“It’s a nice night to sit out on the pizer”